The Death of Process Modeling as We Know It

The Death of Process Modeling as We Know It

We are all too familiar with the indispensable task of business process modeling. “Business process modeling (BPM) in systems engineering is the activity of representing processes of an enterprise, so that the current process may be analyzed or improved. BPM is typically performed by business analysts, who provide expertise in the modeling discipline; by subject matter experts, who have specialized knowledge of the processes being modeled; or more commonly by a team comprising both. Alternatively, the process model can be derived directly from events’ logs using process mining tools. The business objective is often to increase process speed or reduce cycle time; to increase quality; or to reduce costs, such as labor, materials, scrap, or capital costs. In practice, a management decision to invest in business process modeling is often motivated by the need to document requirements for an information technology project.” https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Business_process_modeling And we are all too familiar with the daunting shortcomings of this approach. Even considering the fact that modern process mining might speed up the detection of the as-is processes the modeling of the to-be processes continues to be an unsolved problem. Because you still have to have the endless discussions which process variants are to be discarded and which ones are to be improved for example. Since you have no decision criteria for which process scenario is preferable over the other. Using the navigation system as analogy process mining gets you a tracking of which way you have gone and how fast. But process mining cannot help you with deciding which route is the fastest. Nor does it remind you to start your journey early...
Multiple ERP Systems Divided by a Common Goal

Multiple ERP Systems Divided by a Common Goal

It is not uncommon that companies operate on multiple ERP systems (the average is 4 to 5). And it is also highly questionable whether it would be feasible to overcome this situation or not. Hence this situation will not change for the time to come. Unfortunately, this situation turns out as being a huge obstacle for any end-to-end process optimization. Because to make matters worse these multiple ERP systems have only little in common. Master data are not complete in each system. And where overlapping their keys are not in sync. And processes are cut in half. And where overlapping document numbers and timestamps are not in sync. All these idiosyncrasies contribute to the Sisyphus task of optimizing processes which are spanning multiple systems. Let’s assume you are running your logistics in one ERP system. And your finance people have a different ERP system. Of course you can perfectly manage your inventory in the logistics system. And of course you can perfectly pay your suppliers on time. Or? Your goods arrive on March 15 let’s assume. And you transfer your goods receipt note from your logistics to your finance system within five days; e.g. on March 20. And then you pay your supplier on March 23 let’s say. So far so good. But what if your supplier would introduce a new early payment discount applicable if the invoice is being paid within five days? Then you’d be unable to leverage this advantage. Too bad. What’s the real problem here? This opportunity would probably have gone unnoticed. Even worse. Actually not everything is lost anymore nowadays. Because in essence we...